News

Eerie photos of abandoned malls

Hampton Towne Centre, once known as the Hampton Square Mall, is in Essex Township, Michigan. The site lost retailers over time once one of its anchor stores, Kmart, filed bankruptcy. The mall officially closed in 2010, but was purchased one year later by an optimistic businessman. ...
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Mitch Albom on lasting lessons of "Tuesdays with Morrie"

"Tuesdays with Morrie" details soul-searching conversations between sports writer Mitch Albom and his dying former college professor, Morrie Schwartz. Now, 20 years after the book first came out, Albom joined "CBS This Morning" to discuss Morrie's lasting message, his orphanage in Haiti and the heart-wrenching story of a child there he and his wife cared for like a daughter. "I think most people in their life have had a teacher, and so that's sort of their Morrie. I have people open their wallets to me and take out a picture of their grandfather or somebody like that and say, 'This is my Morrie,'" Albom said. Fifteen million copies of the book have been sold in 45 languages and it continues to find new readers today. "I think a lot of people are lost like I was at that age, sort of saying, I'm going a thousand miles an hour and…
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Service dog owner denied access to airport lounge

SANTA CLARITA, Calif. -- A Santa Clarita woman who is wheelchair-bound says she was kicked out of an airline lounge because of her service dog, CBS Los Angeles reports. Micaela Bensko captured the frustrating ordeal on video as the confrontation unfolded in the Virgin Atlantic lounge at JFK International Airport. Micaela Bensko with her service dog. CBS Los Angeles In the clip, Bensko explains to an airline employee that she paid for the lounge so that she could lie down before her flight due to an injury that prevents her from sitting for more than 30 minutes. Her service dog, Blue Bell, helps pull her in the wheelchair. But the airline employee denied her access to the practically empty lounge, saying: "With Virgin Atlantic policy, with any service animal, you have to have some sort of paperwork." Bensko tearfully replied, "I'm in too much pain. I'm sorry I can't wait…
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Was Ernest Hemingway a spy?

From action on the battlefield to the running of the bulls, the works of famed author Ernest Hemingway take us on amazing adventures. But Hemingway’s own life was full of adventure too, including a little-known chapter when he was apparently a player in the world of international espionage. “Writer, Sailor, Soldier, Spy: Ernest Hemingway’s Secret Adventures, 1935-1961” by Nicholas ReynoldsA new book, “Writer, Sailor, Soldier, Spy,” by Nicholas Reynolds, details Hemingway’s suspected undercover work for both the U.S. and the Russians before and during the Cold War.In late 1940, as Hemingway’s new novel “For Whom the Bell Tolls” was becoming a literary phenomenon, the American author was secretly meeting with a Soviet agent to sign up as a spy, reports “CBS This Morning: Saturday” co-host Anthony Mason.Reynolds, a Hemingway fan since he was a boy, also spent more than a decade as an officer with the Central Intelligence Agency. Reynolds…
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Bringing back a tastier tomato

The U.S. is the second-largest tomato grower in the world, producing around 32 billion pounds a year. But producing the fruit in such large numbers comes at a cost; the sweet taste you may remember from your grandmother’s garden has been lost. Now, researchers have found a way to put the flavor back into tomatoes.Biologist Harry Klee, of the University of Florida in Gainesville, has been researching tomatoes and their disappearing flavor for more than two decades. Horticulturalists are working to pack more flavor into the fruit that’s grown flavorless over the years. CBS NEws “All we’ve done between now and then was to add water to this fruit and make it bigger and bigger,” he told CBS News correspondent David Begnaud.Over the years, tomato plants have been bred to be commercially viable, producing lots of disease-resistant, long-lasting fruit -- big and hardy, but not necessarily tasty. “There are 30…
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DREAMer immigrants warned not to be abroad when Trump's sworn in

NEW YORK - Immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children, but were protected from deportation by President Barack Obama, are being warned by some advocates to make sure they are not traveling abroad when Donald Trump is sworn in as president on Jan. 20.Some advocates, lawyers and universities are concerned that Trump might immediately rescind the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act, an Obama program that had allowed these young immigrants to work and travel for humanitarian, educational or employment purposes.That could lead, they fear, to some people traveling abroad being barred from re-entering the U.S.“We are recommending all travel be completed by or before Jan. 20 in the event laws or procedures experience a drastic change,” said Angelica Salas, executive director of the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles. “We wouldn’t want to expose them to an uncertain situation should they…
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